Jessica Kloepfer

  • 2134

Community Manager @HolisticUnited

Profile Feed

Here’s to...Better habits, Positive thinking, Clean eating, & most of all...Loving Yourself!

  • 100

How well do you communicate your needs, wants, beliefs and aspirations? Can you speak truth from your heart, or do you ‘choke up’ when emotions get heavy?

Here’s a short and simple throat chakra meditation to help balance your 5th chakra and clear the way for direct but heartful communication.

This is a great meditation to do right before meetings, negotiations or important communication of any kind. Try it and let us know how it goes!

If you want to learn more about each chakra of your body, just go here.

 

  • 149

Chances are you’ve heard the wellness community buzzing about honey’s golden child, manuka. Perhaps you’ve even purchased a jar or two for yourself, intent on taking full advantage of its nourishing benefits (and there are lotsof them). Sweet—you’re in the right place.

A quick refresher: Manuka honey is sourced primarily from New Zealand, to the point that New Zealand’s Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) released a strict definition this year as to what can be classified as manuka honey. Top brands like Wedderspoon make it a priority to always abide by those rules—and, as a result, their KFactor 16 manuka honey is guaranteed to meet or exceed the Monofloral Manuka Standard from the New Zealand Government.

At the heart of these rules is the fact that manuka is simply healthier than other honeys. That’s because its nectar has more healthful properties than other nectars—and the extra immune boosting, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial dose means it can help you get over a cold faster, help heal your wounds faster, and may even help clear your skin.

Bottom line? Manuka honey is not only delicious, it’s also the OG cure-all to beat all cure-alls—which is a great reason to incorporate it into your routine when you can. These nine manuka honey hacks will help you do just that.

Continue Reading...

  • 105

A healthy outside starts from the inside - Robert Urich.

  • 70

🦋 What a powerful affirmation! “I am grateful for the ability to change my life” ❤️

  • 78

Highly sensitive people are naturally wired to be hyper-perceptive, meaning they can pick up more readily on subtle stimuli around them. They might be empathic, or able to easily sense the energy and emotions of others, so it's no shock then that highly sensitive people are drawn to working with an intuitive like me. And one thing I've noticed about my HSP clients is they tend to get more overwhelmed than others in the days leading up to events they perceive as potentially stressful.

If you're a highly sensitive person who is prone to this type of anticipatory stress, these tips could help:

Continue Reading...

  • 70

Health is a vehicle. Not a destination - Joshua Rosenthal

  • 106

Caregivers need care

Often, we forget to look at our own health when so concerned with the ones we care for.

I hear it time and time again – from my patients who are caregivers for aging parents or sick children.

Right after they’re finished with caring for others they say, “and then I got sick as soon as it was all over”.  Why is that? And can we do anything to prevent it? One explanation for this phenomenon relates to our adrenal glands.

Our adrenal glands are a pair of organs on top of our kidneys. They are small and mighty: they produce hormones that regulate important body functions like water balance, metabolism, blood pressure, and the body’s response to stress.

The hormone cortisol is essential to the stress response role of the adrenals. Having enough cortisol is necessary for our day-to-day functions, producing energy, and being awake during the daytime.

When the body senses stress, the adrenals release a surge of cortisol.

This surge is what causes the “fight or flight” condition we know in acute stress. It increases blood delivery to the muscles, increases your heart rate and breathing, and it slows processes that are less necessary when under acute stress, such as digestion, immunity, higher brain function, and creating sex hormones.

What’s interesting is that stress can be either physical (running from a tiger) or psychological (being fired form work), but it will produce the same effect on the body. And, in today’s modern world, we are subjected to prolonged periods of psychological stress, with all the downstream effects that that brings.

Picture this: Imagine you have a pair of soaked sponges, spilling over with excess water.

These are your healthy adrenal glands that are full with with energy-producing hormones such as cortisol. With stress, you start to squeeze the sponges little by little.

If you don’t take time to rest, nourish yourself, and refill your sponges, they will slowly start to dry out.

Eventually, you wring out the last few drops of cortisol and reach adrenal fatigue. Your body is no longer able to function properly or handle stress. This is why after someone finishes a big project, completes final exams in university, or no longer needs to care for a sick loved one they find themselves sick shortly thereafter.

When we are caring for a dying parent, we end up holding our breath, putting everything on hold, and doing all that we can in the moments in between – essentially giving all that we have – that our tanks run empty.

For a time, we run on fumes. And when that person departs this place, we can exhale. We let down our guard. We often collapse in exhaustion. And frequently, illness will set in, such as a chronic cough or constant cold that won’t go away.

 

 

Dr. Chris Bjorndal is a Naturopathic Doctor focusing on mental health in Edmonton, AB, Canada. 

www.drchristinabjorndal.com

  • 67

 

There are times in your life when you feel like you are at a crossroads. The weight of the decision that you are trying to make can be crippling. These decisions can be about:

  • your career path and what to study
  • your relationship – whether to leave or stay
  • a friendship – deciding to let it go
  • your job – do you leave it?
  • the weight of a pregnancy that is unplanned and possibly unwanted, etc.

I have been faced with all of these forks in the road in my life. What I have learned is that the best compass to use when navigating the journey of life is to learn to listen to your heart.

If you find yourself making lists, analyzing this angle vs that angle, evaluating the pros and cons, etc, then you are listening to the voice of the egoic mind whose copilots are fear, pain, suffering and protection. These decisions are really matters of the heart, therefore, we need to allow the voice of our heart to speak.

In order to listen to our hearts, we need to quieten the voice of fear coming from our mind and get still so that we can hear the whispers from our heart. This is a fundamental aspect of the work I do with my patients, and what I teach my colleagues who seek guidance from me.

A common concern is differentiating between the voice of the heart and the voice of the mind. If you aren’t used to tuning in to your gut feeling and trusting it, you might doubt its message at first.

It would be nice if we could just call 1-800-DOUBT for assistance. Since that hotline doesn’t exist, we end up calling someone who knows us for help and advice, often a parent, sibling, best friend, colleague or therapist. By talking to someone who knows us, we hope to get clear answers. The key is to learn to trust yourself for the answers versus searching outside of yourself.

When it comes to “matters of the heart,” the answer resides in you. It requires listening. Start by having a conversation with your heart around simple decisions, such as: “Tonight, would you like brown rice or quinoa for dinner?” Or, if you are paleo/keto and don’t eat grains, then ask yourself “chicken or beef tonight”? Slowly work your way up with these small decisions so that you can build your confidence when it comes to making bigger life decisions. I encourage you to check in with your heart for the small decisions you make every day, such as what to wear, which route to take when driving, what to order if you are eating out, what to watch on TV or what to cook for dinner.

I find it helpful to remind myself of this quote by Joseph Campbell: “The heart must usher the mind into the zone of revelation”. We must use our mind for to implement the “how’s” of the heart. Not the other way around. I am here to help you with the process. I have created a course that dives deeper into these teachings. I hope you will join me there. 

Dr Chris Bjorndal is a Naturopathic Doctor focusing on mental health in Edmonton, AB, Canada

https://drchristinabjorndal.com/coaching/ 

  • 59

If you are one of my clients, you've heard it a 1000 times: drinking enough water is one of the most important things you can do to improve your overall health, but also your weight loss (if that's the goal). But do you know why is it so important and why I keep preaching about it? 

Let's explore some facts about water: 

  • We are water! Water makes up nearly 60% of total bodyweight which means that a 100 lb woman actually carries 60 lb of water. Additionally, the more muscle you have, the more water, so keep up with that strength training. 

  • Water is vital for absorbing and transporting nutrients, filtering waste from the blood, and cleansing the colon.

  • Water is also what your liver (healthy liver = healthy body) uses to make quality bile so it can metabolize fat into usable energy and flush out toxins (super important for fat loss!!!!). 

  • If you don’t drink enough water, the bile becomes thick and congested, and your liver's ability to burn fat slows down. When your liver's ability to burn fat slows down, your metabolism slows down right along with it. When your metabolism is low, food has a tendency to turn into fat and you become much more fatigued. 

  • Through the normal activities of daily living, the average adult loses about 6 pints / 12 cups of fluid a day in sweat, urine, exhaled air from breathing, and through our bowel movements.

  • We lose approximately 4 to 8 cups of water just from breathing. How many of you get less than that per day? I know I did till I was about 25 years old and got my act together. 

  • It has been medically proven that just a 5% drop in body fluids will cause a 25% to 30% loss of energy in the average person. When you have no energy, you’re not motivated to take care of yourself, and healthy living is difficult to sustain. 

  • Symptoms of even mild chronic dehydration include headaches, feeling tired and groggy, constipation, joint pain, back pain, allergies, asthma, high blood pressure, dry skin. 

  • Severe chronic dehydration can lead to more serious problems with blood pressure, circulation, kidney function, immune system function, and they digestive disorders.

  • We also often feel hugry becuase we are dehydrated. 

  • Larger people require more water than smaller people therefore body size is important. Sweating rates, exercise  and warmer climates will also increase your water requirements.

  • Consumption of foods high in fat, sugar and sodium (i.e. processed foods) require more water intake. 

  • Carbohydrate storage increases water storage in the body while higher protein intakes tend to stimulate small additional fluid losses (because the body must increase its removal of urinary urea). Switching to high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet triggers very rapid water loss, from decreased stored carbohydrates and increased urinary urea production. This loss however, it only short terms and after a few days on the new diet, those losses stabilize.

 

What will you gain by drinking more water? 

- you will have more energy

- you will digest and absorb your food better ( >>>> easier weight loss)

- you will burn fat more efficiently ( >>>> easier weight loss)

- you will feel less hungry ( >>>> easier weight loss)

- you will go to the bathroom more regularly ( >>>> easier weight loss)

- you will feel less groggy, achy and tired  

- you will flush out more toxins ( >>>> easier weight loss)

- you will be getting more exercise (walking to the bathroom counts) 

- every system in your body will function better 

 

How much water should you drink per day? 

 

A good rule of thumb is to drink half of your body weight in ounces, so a 140 lb woman requires about 70 oz of water.

If you exercise, you need additional water - about 16 oz of water per hour of exercise. 

 

Important note: 

If you are currently dehydrated and not getting more than 4 cups per day, best way to increase your water intake is to do it gradually. Add 8 oz of water per day for a week, then increase to two 8 oz of water per day, until you reach your required amount. 

 

 

How to quickly check your hydration status? 

One way to determine proper fluid levels in the body is by checking your urine color. Anything from gold brown to dark brown indicate dehydration and an immediate need for fluid consumption.

 

 

Tips on drinking more water throughout the day: 

  • upon waking (when we are most dehydrated) start your day with a tall glass of water, or even better, lemon water (8oz of warm water with freshly squeezed half lemon); 

  • drink a tall glass of water for every alcoholic drink, coffee, soda, juice or any other calorie-rich liquid; 

  • drink a glass of water  before or after you walk your dog, talk to a friend on the phone,  make morning coffee, etc. -> attaching a new habit to an already existing habit is a great way to start; 

  • carry a bottle of water with you everywhere you go (I highly recommend buying a glass or stainless steel bottle); 

  • set a reminder in your phone to have a glass of water at specific times. 

 

Did you like this article? Then share it with your friends and family. If you have any questions, please contact me here.

  • 64

Magnesium: The Miracle Mineral by Dr. Monica Bickerstaff Riley

 

fes8nadweeueceainajwnsfpx5tpytqa.jpgMagnesium is often the silent partner to calcium,  but its impact on body wellness is equally potent! The crucial health benefits of magnesium include solving or preventing osteoporosis, heart attacks, hypertension, constipation, migraines, leg cramps, kidney stones, gallstones and more. Magnesium is an essential part of alternative medicine.

 

7 Health Benefits Of Magnesium:

 

  • Magnesium for Bones: One of the health benefits of magnesium is strong bones.
  • Magnesium for Constipation: Easing constipation is one of the health benefits of magnesium. If your body has too little calcium and magnesium, you may have inadequate peristalsis, which is that automatic pushing you feel, those automatic contractions that happen during a bowel movement.
  • Magnesium for Kidney Stones: Taking magnesium, along with vitamin B6, significantly reduces the formation of calcium oxalate kidney stones.
  • Magnesium As Treatment For Heart Attack: Intravenous magnesium, when given as soon as possible after a heart attack, decreases death rate.
  • Magnesium For Migraines: Health benefits of magnesium include relieving migraines. To stop a migraine headache, take a relatively rapid intravenous injection of magnesium and vitamin B6.
  • Magnesium For Hypertension: Among the health benefits of magnesium may be the regulation of blood pressure.
  • Magnesium For Incontinence: Women with urinary urge incontinence (also called overactive bladder) may benefit from taking magnesium supplements.

You should take twice as much magnesium as calcium. So, for example, if your daily intake of calcium is 500 milligrams, then you should take 1,000 milligrams of magnesium.

To enjoy the health benefits of magnesium, consume good dietary sources of magnesium, which include nuts (especially almonds), whole grains, wheat germ, fish, and green leafy vegetables. Approximately 80% of the magnesium is lost when whole grains are refined to white flour. Processed foods typically are low in magnesium, and as many as three-quarters of Americans consume less than the Recommended Dietary Allowance for magnesium.

"Living well...one healthy step at a time"

 

 

  • 53

I used to be a pot-a-day coffee nut. But my caffeine habit ended up causing heart palpitations (which were totally benign, but still scary!), and major crashes in the afternoon after the caffeine wore off.

I kicked my caffeine habit, but my energy levels paid the price. Getting more sleep just wasn’t an option, thanks to my son’s four-month sleep regression.

If you’re looking for natural energy boosters, here are seven that promise to pep you up as effectively as your afternoon latte, but without the caffeine.

Continue Reading...

  • 225
... or jump to: 2017
Profile Feed

Here’s to...Better habits, Positive thinking, Clean eating, & most of all...Loving Yourself!

  • 100

How well do you communicate your needs, wants, beliefs and aspirations? Can you speak truth from your heart, or do you ‘choke up’ when emotions get heavy?

Here’s a short and simple throat chakra meditation to help balance your 5th chakra and clear the way for direct but heartful communication.

This is a great meditation to do right before meetings, negotiations or important communication of any kind. Try it and let us know how it goes!

If you want to learn more about each chakra of your body, just go here.

 

  • 149

Chances are you’ve heard the wellness community buzzing about honey’s golden child, manuka. Perhaps you’ve even purchased a jar or two for yourself, intent on taking full advantage of its nourishing benefits (and there are lotsof them). Sweet—you’re in the right place.

A quick refresher: Manuka honey is sourced primarily from New Zealand, to the point that New Zealand’s Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) released a strict definition this year as to what can be classified as manuka honey. Top brands like Wedderspoon make it a priority to always abide by those rules—and, as a result, their KFactor 16 manuka honey is guaranteed to meet or exceed the Monofloral Manuka Standard from the New Zealand Government.

At the heart of these rules is the fact that manuka is simply healthier than other honeys. That’s because its nectar has more healthful properties than other nectars—and the extra immune boosting, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial dose means it can help you get over a cold faster, help heal your wounds faster, and may even help clear your skin.

Bottom line? Manuka honey is not only delicious, it’s also the OG cure-all to beat all cure-alls—which is a great reason to incorporate it into your routine when you can. These nine manuka honey hacks will help you do just that.

Continue Reading...

  • 105

A healthy outside starts from the inside - Robert Urich.

  • 70

🦋 What a powerful affirmation! “I am grateful for the ability to change my life” ❤️

  • 78

Highly sensitive people are naturally wired to be hyper-perceptive, meaning they can pick up more readily on subtle stimuli around them. They might be empathic, or able to easily sense the energy and emotions of others, so it's no shock then that highly sensitive people are drawn to working with an intuitive like me. And one thing I've noticed about my HSP clients is they tend to get more overwhelmed than others in the days leading up to events they perceive as potentially stressful.

If you're a highly sensitive person who is prone to this type of anticipatory stress, these tips could help:

Continue Reading...

  • 70

Health is a vehicle. Not a destination - Joshua Rosenthal

  • 106

Caregivers need care

Often, we forget to look at our own health when so concerned with the ones we care for.

I hear it time and time again – from my patients who are caregivers for aging parents or sick children.

Right after they’re finished with caring for others they say, “and then I got sick as soon as it was all over”.  Why is that? And can we do anything to prevent it? One explanation for this phenomenon relates to our adrenal glands.

Our adrenal glands are a pair of organs on top of our kidneys. They are small and mighty: they produce hormones that regulate important body functions like water balance, metabolism, blood pressure, and the body’s response to stress.

The hormone cortisol is essential to the stress response role of the adrenals. Having enough cortisol is necessary for our day-to-day functions, producing energy, and being awake during the daytime.

When the body senses stress, the adrenals release a surge of cortisol.

This surge is what causes the “fight or flight” condition we know in acute stress. It increases blood delivery to the muscles, increases your heart rate and breathing, and it slows processes that are less necessary when under acute stress, such as digestion, immunity, higher brain function, and creating sex hormones.

What’s interesting is that stress can be either physical (running from a tiger) or psychological (being fired form work), but it will produce the same effect on the body. And, in today’s modern world, we are subjected to prolonged periods of psychological stress, with all the downstream effects that that brings.

Picture this: Imagine you have a pair of soaked sponges, spilling over with excess water.

These are your healthy adrenal glands that are full with with energy-producing hormones such as cortisol. With stress, you start to squeeze the sponges little by little.

If you don’t take time to rest, nourish yourself, and refill your sponges, they will slowly start to dry out.

Eventually, you wring out the last few drops of cortisol and reach adrenal fatigue. Your body is no longer able to function properly or handle stress. This is why after someone finishes a big project, completes final exams in university, or no longer needs to care for a sick loved one they find themselves sick shortly thereafter.

When we are caring for a dying parent, we end up holding our breath, putting everything on hold, and doing all that we can in the moments in between – essentially giving all that we have – that our tanks run empty.

For a time, we run on fumes. And when that person departs this place, we can exhale. We let down our guard. We often collapse in exhaustion. And frequently, illness will set in, such as a chronic cough or constant cold that won’t go away.

 

 

Dr. Chris Bjorndal is a Naturopathic Doctor focusing on mental health in Edmonton, AB, Canada. 

www.drchristinabjorndal.com

  • 67

 

There are times in your life when you feel like you are at a crossroads. The weight of the decision that you are trying to make can be crippling. These decisions can be about:

  • your career path and what to study
  • your relationship – whether to leave or stay
  • a friendship – deciding to let it go
  • your job – do you leave it?
  • the weight of a pregnancy that is unplanned and possibly unwanted, etc.

I have been faced with all of these forks in the road in my life. What I have learned is that the best compass to use when navigating the journey of life is to learn to listen to your heart.

If you find yourself making lists, analyzing this angle vs that angle, evaluating the pros and cons, etc, then you are listening to the voice of the egoic mind whose copilots are fear, pain, suffering and protection. These decisions are really matters of the heart, therefore, we need to allow the voice of our heart to speak.

In order to listen to our hearts, we need to quieten the voice of fear coming from our mind and get still so that we can hear the whispers from our heart. This is a fundamental aspect of the work I do with my patients, and what I teach my colleagues who seek guidance from me.

A common concern is differentiating between the voice of the heart and the voice of the mind. If you aren’t used to tuning in to your gut feeling and trusting it, you might doubt its message at first.

It would be nice if we could just call 1-800-DOUBT for assistance. Since that hotline doesn’t exist, we end up calling someone who knows us for help and advice, often a parent, sibling, best friend, colleague or therapist. By talking to someone who knows us, we hope to get clear answers. The key is to learn to trust yourself for the answers versus searching outside of yourself.

When it comes to “matters of the heart,” the answer resides in you. It requires listening. Start by having a conversation with your heart around simple decisions, such as: “Tonight, would you like brown rice or quinoa for dinner?” Or, if you are paleo/keto and don’t eat grains, then ask yourself “chicken or beef tonight”? Slowly work your way up with these small decisions so that you can build your confidence when it comes to making bigger life decisions. I encourage you to check in with your heart for the small decisions you make every day, such as what to wear, which route to take when driving, what to order if you are eating out, what to watch on TV or what to cook for dinner.

I find it helpful to remind myself of this quote by Joseph Campbell: “The heart must usher the mind into the zone of revelation”. We must use our mind for to implement the “how’s” of the heart. Not the other way around. I am here to help you with the process. I have created a course that dives deeper into these teachings. I hope you will join me there. 

Dr Chris Bjorndal is a Naturopathic Doctor focusing on mental health in Edmonton, AB, Canada

https://drchristinabjorndal.com/coaching/ 

  • 59

If you are one of my clients, you've heard it a 1000 times: drinking enough water is one of the most important things you can do to improve your overall health, but also your weight loss (if that's the goal). But do you know why is it so important and why I keep preaching about it? 

Let's explore some facts about water: 

  • We are water! Water makes up nearly 60% of total bodyweight which means that a 100 lb woman actually carries 60 lb of water. Additionally, the more muscle you have, the more water, so keep up with that strength training. 

  • Water is vital for absorbing and transporting nutrients, filtering waste from the blood, and cleansing the colon.

  • Water is also what your liver (healthy liver = healthy body) uses to make quality bile so it can metabolize fat into usable energy and flush out toxins (super important for fat loss!!!!). 

  • If you don’t drink enough water, the bile becomes thick and congested, and your liver's ability to burn fat slows down. When your liver's ability to burn fat slows down, your metabolism slows down right along with it. When your metabolism is low, food has a tendency to turn into fat and you become much more fatigued. 

  • Through the normal activities of daily living, the average adult loses about 6 pints / 12 cups of fluid a day in sweat, urine, exhaled air from breathing, and through our bowel movements.

  • We lose approximately 4 to 8 cups of water just from breathing. How many of you get less than that per day? I know I did till I was about 25 years old and got my act together. 

  • It has been medically proven that just a 5% drop in body fluids will cause a 25% to 30% loss of energy in the average person. When you have no energy, you’re not motivated to take care of yourself, and healthy living is difficult to sustain. 

  • Symptoms of even mild chronic dehydration include headaches, feeling tired and groggy, constipation, joint pain, back pain, allergies, asthma, high blood pressure, dry skin. 

  • Severe chronic dehydration can lead to more serious problems with blood pressure, circulation, kidney function, immune system function, and they digestive disorders.

  • We also often feel hugry becuase we are dehydrated. 

  • Larger people require more water than smaller people therefore body size is important. Sweating rates, exercise  and warmer climates will also increase your water requirements.

  • Consumption of foods high in fat, sugar and sodium (i.e. processed foods) require more water intake. 

  • Carbohydrate storage increases water storage in the body while higher protein intakes tend to stimulate small additional fluid losses (because the body must increase its removal of urinary urea). Switching to high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet triggers very rapid water loss, from decreased stored carbohydrates and increased urinary urea production. This loss however, it only short terms and after a few days on the new diet, those losses stabilize.

 

What will you gain by drinking more water? 

- you will have more energy

- you will digest and absorb your food better ( >>>> easier weight loss)

- you will burn fat more efficiently ( >>>> easier weight loss)

- you will feel less hungry ( >>>> easier weight loss)

- you will go to the bathroom more regularly ( >>>> easier weight loss)

- you will feel less groggy, achy and tired  

- you will flush out more toxins ( >>>> easier weight loss)

- you will be getting more exercise (walking to the bathroom counts) 

- every system in your body will function better 

 

How much water should you drink per day? 

 

A good rule of thumb is to drink half of your body weight in ounces, so a 140 lb woman requires about 70 oz of water.

If you exercise, you need additional water - about 16 oz of water per hour of exercise. 

 

Important note: 

If you are currently dehydrated and not getting more than 4 cups per day, best way to increase your water intake is to do it gradually. Add 8 oz of water per day for a week, then increase to two 8 oz of water per day, until you reach your required amount. 

 

 

How to quickly check your hydration status? 

One way to determine proper fluid levels in the body is by checking your urine color. Anything from gold brown to dark brown indicate dehydration and an immediate need for fluid consumption.

 

 

Tips on drinking more water throughout the day: 

  • upon waking (when we are most dehydrated) start your day with a tall glass of water, or even better, lemon water (8oz of warm water with freshly squeezed half lemon); 

  • drink a tall glass of water for every alcoholic drink, coffee, soda, juice or any other calorie-rich liquid; 

  • drink a glass of water  before or after you walk your dog, talk to a friend on the phone,  make morning coffee, etc. -> attaching a new habit to an already existing habit is a great way to start; 

  • carry a bottle of water with you everywhere you go (I highly recommend buying a glass or stainless steel bottle); 

  • set a reminder in your phone to have a glass of water at specific times. 

 

Did you like this article? Then share it with your friends and family. If you have any questions, please contact me here.

  • 64

Magnesium: The Miracle Mineral by Dr. Monica Bickerstaff Riley

 

fes8nadweeueceainajwnsfpx5tpytqa.jpgMagnesium is often the silent partner to calcium,  but its impact on body wellness is equally potent! The crucial health benefits of magnesium include solving or preventing osteoporosis, heart attacks, hypertension, constipation, migraines, leg cramps, kidney stones, gallstones and more. Magnesium is an essential part of alternative medicine.

 

7 Health Benefits Of Magnesium:

 

  • Magnesium for Bones: One of the health benefits of magnesium is strong bones.
  • Magnesium for Constipation: Easing constipation is one of the health benefits of magnesium. If your body has too little calcium and magnesium, you may have inadequate peristalsis, which is that automatic pushing you feel, those automatic contractions that happen during a bowel movement.
  • Magnesium for Kidney Stones: Taking magnesium, along with vitamin B6, significantly reduces the formation of calcium oxalate kidney stones.
  • Magnesium As Treatment For Heart Attack: Intravenous magnesium, when given as soon as possible after a heart attack, decreases death rate.
  • Magnesium For Migraines: Health benefits of magnesium include relieving migraines. To stop a migraine headache, take a relatively rapid intravenous injection of magnesium and vitamin B6.
  • Magnesium For Hypertension: Among the health benefits of magnesium may be the regulation of blood pressure.
  • Magnesium For Incontinence: Women with urinary urge incontinence (also called overactive bladder) may benefit from taking magnesium supplements.

You should take twice as much magnesium as calcium. So, for example, if your daily intake of calcium is 500 milligrams, then you should take 1,000 milligrams of magnesium.

To enjoy the health benefits of magnesium, consume good dietary sources of magnesium, which include nuts (especially almonds), whole grains, wheat germ, fish, and green leafy vegetables. Approximately 80% of the magnesium is lost when whole grains are refined to white flour. Processed foods typically are low in magnesium, and as many as three-quarters of Americans consume less than the Recommended Dietary Allowance for magnesium.

"Living well...one healthy step at a time"

 

 

  • 53

I used to be a pot-a-day coffee nut. But my caffeine habit ended up causing heart palpitations (which were totally benign, but still scary!), and major crashes in the afternoon after the caffeine wore off.

I kicked my caffeine habit, but my energy levels paid the price. Getting more sleep just wasn’t an option, thanks to my son’s four-month sleep regression.

If you’re looking for natural energy boosters, here are seven that promise to pep you up as effectively as your afternoon latte, but without the caffeine.

Continue Reading...

  • 225
... or jump to: 2017
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